A History of Modern Translation Knowledge 2018

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A History of Modern Translation Knowledge

Sources, Concepts, Effects

Lieven D’hulst & Yves Gambier 2018


E-Book: 485 English Pages

Price: 5.000 Toman

Download: A History of Modern Translation Knowledge: Sources, Concepts, Effects (D’hulst & Gambier 2018).


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A History of Modern Translation Knowledge is the first attempt to map the coming into being of modern thinking about translation. It breaks with the well-established tradition of viewing history through the reductive lens of schools, theories, turns or interdisciplinary exchanges. It also challenges the artificial distinction between past and present and it sustains that the latter’s historical roots go back far beyond the 1970s. Translation Studies is but part of a broader set of discourses on translation we propose to label “translation knowledge”. This book concentrates on seven processes that make up the history of modern translation knowledge: generating, mapping, internationalising, historicising, analysing, disseminating and applying knowledge. All processes are covered by 58 domain experts and allocated over 55 chapters, with cross-references. This book is indispensable reading for advanced Master- and PhD-students in Translation Studies who need background information on the history of their field, with relevance for Europe, the Americas and large parts of Asia. It will also interest students and scholars working in cultural and social history.


“The vital issues of this volume provide a stimulating and very comprehensive account of the history of modern translation knowledge. The book manifests the high institutionalization of the discipline and serves as a field guide for anyone planning to navigate translation history, especially in a transdisciplinary perspective.”

Michaela Wolf, University of Graz


“In essence a historiography of modern translation studies, this monumental work represents a gargantuan effort to lay a new framework for understanding the growth and evolution of the discipline. D’hulst and Gambier have assembled some 55 essays on the ways in which translation knowledge has been created, explicated and circulated in various interactive modes, written by scholars who themselves are part of that history. Significantly, the collection also points the way forward by giving shape to the proliferation of discourses that accompanied the “rise” of translation studies, and is thus an invaluable reference source for young, emerging researchers who may feel overwhelmed by the field’s spectacular developments.”
Leo Tak-hung Chan, Lingnan University, Hong Kong
General introduction
Lieven D’hulst and Yves Gambier
2–14
Part 1. Generating knowledge
18–98
Chapter 1.0. Introduction
17–18
Chapter 1.1. Concepts of translation
Yves Gambier
19–38
Chapter 1.2. Tropes (Metaphor, Metonymy)
James St. André
39–44
Chapter 1.3. Biblical myths
Claire Placial
45–50
Chapter 1.4. Fictional representations
Klaus Kaindl
51–56
Chapter 1.5. The sacred and taboo
Douglas Robinson
57–60
Chapter 1.6. The modern regime of translation and its politics
Naoki Sakai
61–74
Chapter 1.7. Translation and adjacent concepts
Rita Bueno Maia, Hanna Pięta and Alexandra Assis Rosa
75–84
Chapter 1.8. Expansions
John Ødemark and Eivind Engebretsen
85–90
Chapter 1.9. Semiotics
Ubaldo Stecconi
91–94
Chapter 1.10. Rhetoric
Ubaldo Stecconi
95–98
Part 2. Mapping knowledge
102–148
Chapter 2.0. Introduction
101–102
Chapter 2.1. Print history
Norbert Bachleitner
103–112
Chapter 2.2. Technology
Deborah A. Folaron
113–116
Chapter 2.3. Bibliometric tools: Evaluation, mapping
Sara Rovira-Esteva and Javier Franco Aixelá
117–122
Chapter 2.4. Localisation
Keiran J. Dunne
123–126
Chapter 2.5. Circulation and spread of knowledge
Deborah A. Folaron
127–134
Chapter 2.6. Transfer modes
Lieven D’hulst
135–142
Chapter 2.7. Turns
Mary Snell-Hornby
143–148
Part 3. Internationalising knowledge
152–230
Chapter 3.0. Introduction
151–152
Chapter 3.1. The history of internationalization in translation studies and its impact on translation theory
Maria Tymoczko
153–170
Chapter 3.2. Eurocentrism
Luc van Doorslaer
171–174
Chapter 3.3. Globalisation
Michael Cronin
175–178
Chapter 3.4. Institutionalization of translation studies
Yves Gambier
179–194
Chapter 3.5. Universal languages
Karen Bennett
195–202
Chapter 3.6. Forms and formats of dissemination of translation knowledge
Alexandra Assis Rosa
203–214
Chapter 3.7. Translation politics and policies
Reine Meylaerts
215–224
Chapter 3.8. History of reception: Censorship
Denise Merkle
225–230
Part 4. Historicizing knowledge
234–281
Chapter 4.0. Introduction
233–234
Chapter 4.1. Temporality
Christopher Rundle
235–246
Chapter 4.2. Archives
Pekka Kujamäki
247–250
Chapter 4.3. Microhistory
Judy Wakabayashi
251–254
Chapter 4.4. Comparative history
Roberto A. Valdeón
255–260
Chapter 4.5. Connected history and histoire croisée
Judy Wakabayashi
261–266
Chapter 4.6. Oral history
Julie McDonough Dolmaya
267–272
Chapter 4.7. Memory studies
Angela Kershaw
273–276
Chapter 4.8. Counterfactual history
Lieven D’hulst
277–282
Part 5. Analysing knowledge
286–351
Chapter 5.0. Introduction
285–286
Chapter 5.1. Translated texts / paratexts
Şehnaz Tahir Gürçaglar
287–292
Chapter 5.2. Process research
Maureen Ehrensberger-Dow
293–300
Chapter 5.3. Translation analysis
Jeremy Munday
301–308
Chapter 5.4. Hermeneutics
Bernd Stefanink and Ioana Bălăcescu
309–316
Chapter 5.5. Deconstruction
Kaisa Koskinen
317–322
Chapter 5.6. Localism
Mirella Agorni
323–324
Chapter 5.7. Ethnography
Peter Flynn
325–330
Chapter 5.8. Translation zones/spaces
Sherry Simon
331–336
Chapter 5.9. Sociological models and translation history
Hélène Buzelin
337–346
Chapter 5.10. Feminism, gender, and translation
Luise von Flotow
347–352
Part 6. Disseminating knowledge
358–403
Chapter 6.0. Introduction
355–356
Chapter 6.1. Linguistics
Sonia Vandepitte, Lieve Jooken, Robert M. Maier and Binghan Zheng
357–366
Chapter 6.2. Literary research
Dirk Delabastita
367–376
Chapter 6.3. Communication Studies
Jens Loenhoff
377–384
Chapter 6.4. Cognitive research
Gregory M. Shreve
385–388
Chapter 6.5. History of translation knowledge of monotheistic religions with written tradition
Jacobus A. Naudé
389–396
Chapter 6.6. Legal history
Valérie Dullion
397–400
Chapter 6.7. Political history
Susan Pickford
401–404
Part 7. Applying knowledge
408–448
Chapter 7.0. Introduction
407–408
Chapter 7.1. Language learning
Sara Laviosa
409–414
Chapter 7.2. Training
Amparo Hurtado Albir
415–428
Chapter 7.3. Research schools: The example of the UK
Susan Bassnett
429–434
Chapter 7.4. Assessment
Claudia V. Angelelli
435–442
Chapter 7.5. Translation ethics
Andrew Chesterman

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